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Prayer Services

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Beit Am welcomes diversity in Jewish worship and seeks opportunities to accommodate its congregation. Religious Services are held on a regular basis. In all services men and women are counted in the minyan and are called to the Torah. Newcomers and visitors are most welcome at all the services. Click here to read a note about healing prayers in our services.
The schedule of services is included in the community events calendar. The schedule of the services uses these terms to describe the types of services being held on any particular date:

Erev Shabbat Family Service and Dinner (First Friday of each month.)

Families and individuals of all ages are welcome for a service full of music and story, followed by Shabbat dinner. Please RSVP ahead to taranhome@comcast.net if you will be joining us for dinner. Everyone is welcome to join us for any part or all of the evening.

Kabbalat Shabbat Friday Evening Services

7:30 pm on the 2nd and 4th Friday of the month.
A musical evening. The ensemble of Beit Am musicians will help us raise our voices in joyful prayer as we welcome in Shabbat together.

HOST AN ONEG : Click Here for guidelines on hosting an oneg for Kabbalat Shabbat Friday Service.
You can  SIGN UP to host an oneg by clicking HERE.

Sim Shalom Shabbat morning service

Meets as scheduled, 9:30 am to 12:00 noon, using the Sim Shalom (Conservative) siddur, followed by a kiddush. It is a full service, mostly in Hebrew with lots of singing, an abbreviated Torah reading, and a brief devar Torah. Egalitarian. 

Shir Hadash Shabbat morning service, “A New Song”

Meets as scheduled, A service full of musical davennen (prayer) as well as times for quiet. The service will include a brief and participatory Torah service. People of all ages should feel welcome to enter and exit as they please, and hopefully find something meaningful and spiritually nourishing. Kiddush and potluck lunch (if you’re able—but don’t let it keep you away!) will follow right at noon.

Note: Egalitarian indicates that men and women are counted in the minyan as well as called to the Torah.

Newcomers and visitors are welcome at all the services.

The schedule of services is included in the community events calendar. 

 


 

Melodies we use at Beit Am on Erev Shabbat (Friday night)

These are melodies we commonly use at Beit Am. They originate from a wide range of sources, and we have tried our best to give appropriate attribution. If you know of ways in which we have done so inaccurately or inadequately, please let us know.

  1. Shalom Aleikhem, melody by Israel Goldfarb
  2. Dodi Li, melody by Nira Chen
  3. Lekha Dodi, origin of melody unknown
  4. Tov Lehodot, melody from minyan Shira Hadasha in Jerusalem
  5. Barekhu, traditional
  6. Ahavah Rabah, modern
  7. Ahavat Olam, traditional
  8. Shema and Ve-ahavta, traditional
  9. Mi Khamokha, melody by Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach
  10. Hatzi Kaddish, traditional
  11. Veshamru, melody by Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach
  12. Shalom Rav, melody by Debbie Friedman
  13. Ma Gadlu, melody by Shefa Gold
  14. Mi Sheberakh, melody by Debbie Friedman
  15. Aleinu, traditional
  16. Adon Olam, melody by Rabbi Yitzhak Husbands-Hankin
  17. Dodi Li, used in Family service
  18. Shalom Rav 
  19. Wings of Peace
  20. La Yehudim

 


 

Melodies for Erev Shabbat at Home

These are melodies commonly used at member's homes. Learn more at Erev Shabbat At Home. They originate from a wide range of sources, and we have tried our best to give appropriate attribution. If you know of ways in which we have done so inaccurately or inadequately, please let us know.

  1. Candle Lighting 
  2. Shalom Aleikhem, melody by Israel Goldfarb 
  3. Kiddush  
    1.  

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